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Einstein Citadels

Einstein Citadels



1. Introduction



Relativity is the highest and most complex structure in science. This statement applies not only to physics but to all the existing sciences, and as far as I know, no one disputes it. It is a skyscraper among other human-scale buildings a few stories high. This theory is a monstrosity, said A. Michelson, Einstein's contemporary and one of the leading geniuses of his time in physics - and he meant it in no way as a compliment. On the contrary! He spent his life trying to replace the monster with something smaller and simpler.


The theory of relativity is far beyond the level of knowledge and understanding that an educated man can be expected to have. So there is no shame in not understanding it, and no shame in not knowing its details. After all, it is not taught in school - it would surely be a failure on the part of both students and the school. But there are quite a few who do understand the gist of the theory and summarise it something like this. And the complex mathematics of the system is uncontroversial." Well - we shall see!


We like relativity. It hasn't made our student years as bitter as the so-called right-hand rule or Bernoulli's equation. But it's more than that! We need something awe-inspiring in our lives, something unattainable and sublime! "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious!" - Einstein said, and his theory is indeed mysterious.


We are great believers in relativity. We need some sure grips in our lives. Some near and some far. The theory of relativity is very distant, but it seems to be a very sure point. All of this together leads to people happily and uncritically believing it.


Relativity is also very much believed in by science. No, it is not a mistake to use the word "belief". The vast majority of scientists are not physicists, but the vast majority of physicists are engaged in something else entirely and have never had time to delve into this particular area. So they believe, just like the rest of us ordinary people. Most of those few thousand specialists also work on the roof of the building. They are trying to build new floors on top of it, while they have neither the time nor the energy to check the foundations. But those who are really looking at the foundations are experiencing more and more problems. They are finding more and more clashes with the latest experimental results and theoretical trends in science. "There are very big problems..." - they should say, but this grave sentence can be postponed.


In this book, we will mostly look at the edifice of relativity from the outside. That way we can learn the necessary lessons. For it is not necessary to go into a dilapidated village building with a leaky roof to conclude: "This is not the castle of royalty!" We will not use mathematical formulae to look around. Quoting some simple formulae seems appropriate, but there will be no real mathematical derivation, proof, or disproof in this book. And those who can't stand formula citations and would skip them at heart will hardly be at a loss. There will, however, be readers who believe only in mathematical derivations, and can only think in the language of mathematics. I advise them to look for the error in the initial conditions of the derivations that are quoted in the familiar books. A logical error, or the imprecision, ambiguity, or unreliability of the concepts used. Then look for the same at the end of the derivation, in its interpretation. The list of errors in this book itself.


     It also appears to contain many superfluous details, digressions, and irrelevant topics.  In such cases, we are picking through the misconceptions, delusions, and prejudices that are attached to relativity. There are many of these, and they are far more dangerous than the false scientific claims themselves because they are malleable and hidden.  Unfortunately, they are overwhelmingly what motivates the opinions of the uninformed. 


Content:



1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.1. The first road junction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ,
8
1.2. Absolute or relative? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
1.3. Two support columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . .
17
1.4. The man of the 20th century . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
2. Warning signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . . . .
36
2.1. The clock tower of Bern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , .
37
2.2. The M-M experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . .
48
2.3. The foundations of science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ,
60
3. A closer look. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ,
64
3.1. Columns of the structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
67
3.2. Paradoxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . .
72
3.3. The famous essay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , .
82
4. Others see it differently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
4.1. On Relativity Lajos Jánossy . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
4.2. On relativity János Szentágothai . . . . . . . . .
94
4.3. On Relativity Károly Novobátzky . . . . . . . . . .
95
4.4. On Relativity Lajos Maróthy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
4.5. On Relativity György Murguly . . . . . . . . . . . .
97
4.6. On relativity Ove Tedenstig . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
4.7. On Relativity Tibor Elek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
105
4.8. On relativity Albert Einstein . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110
5. Refutations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . . .
113
5.1. Faster than light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,
115
5.2. Cosmic background radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
117
5.3. Gravitational light bending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
5.4. SR v Venus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ,
132
6. Back to the old way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , .
143
6.1 DT, an old-new idea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
144
6.2. SR and DT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . .
148
6.3. Water, air, ether . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
153
6.4. The physical vacuum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . .
158
6.5. Structure of the aether . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ,
166
7. Seven theories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . .
175
7.1. SR - the theory of relativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
176
7.2. AA - the absolute aether theory . . . . . . . . . . . . .
176
7.3. DT - the theory of the drifting aether . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
177
7.4. PE - the theory of the rotating aether . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
178
7.5 RH - short-range aether theory . . . . .
178
7.6. 11D - a multidimensional field theory . . . . . . . . . .
179
7.7 OS - the Reader's own theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
8. Seven experiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . .
181
8.1 The optical Doppler effect: changing the colour of light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
182
8.2 The Fizeau experiment: water carries light .
185
8.3 The M-M experiment: why should it be a signal? . . . . .
189
8.4 The Sagnac interferometer: spinning, but at least it gives a signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , , . . . . . . . .
194
8.5 The M-G experiment: the Earth really does rotate! . . . . . . . . .
205
8.6 The Macek-Davis experiment: highly sensitive . .
207
8.7 The example of the scooter train: which one is shorter? . . . . . . . . .
213
9. High-tech and theories . . . . . . . . . . . .
219
9.1. GPS, the global positioning system . . . .
220
9.2 GPS also ranks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,. . .
232
10. Final SEMC membership card . . . . . . . . . . . . .
235
Appendix 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
242
12. Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
244
13. Ear text
247 

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